Sunday 21st December 2014,
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Phi Psi pets pups for philanthropy

Brian Williams March 6, 2014 News No Comments
Students play with dogs from the Canine Collective shelter at Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity’s ‘Dog Day’s’ Philanthropy event March 2. Photos courtesy Phi Kappa Psi

Students play with dogs from the Canine Collective shelter at Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity’s ‘Dog Day’s’ Philanthropy event March 2.
Photos courtesy Phi Kappa Psi

Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity unleashed cuteness last Sunday for its first “Dog Days” philanthropy event.

Dogs and cats were brought to Ohio Wesleyan University’s campus from two different animal rescue organizations in Delaware, Canine Collective and Colony Cats.

Both of the organizations hope that this will be the start to an annual partnership, and according to Phi Psi Vice President and philanthropy chair Nate Goodhart, the house is already thinking of ideas that could make next year’s Dog Days even better.

“We have had many rescues as house dogs over the past few decades, as is our current dog Rich and we felt that it was our time to give back,”  Goodhart said.

“Both canine Collective and Colony Cats are no kill shelters and bring in strays off the streets, keeping them away from being put down or starving to death.  We felt that this was a great cause to support.”

Goodhart thanked the support of both Kappa Alpha Theta and The Modern Foreign Language House for their help in throwing the event.

All Canine Collective dogs are available for adoption, and applications were available for anyone who wished to adopt.

The main objective was to raise both funds and awareness.  Phi Psi requested a $2 donation from each attendee with all proceeds going to benefit the Canine Collective’s efforts.

 Students play with dogs from the Canine Collective shelter at Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity’s ‘Dog Day’s’ Philanthropy event March 2.

Students play with dogs from the Canine Collective shelter at Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity’s ‘Dog Day’s’ Philanthropy event March 2.

 The Canine Cause 

Jean Lally, a Canine Collective volunteer, elaborated on some of the Collective’s goals.

“In the short term we aim to save dog’s lives,” she said. “We want to rescue dogs and give them short term housing and care before finding them a good home.  These animals deserve better then what many shelters currently provide and long term we want to collaborate to build a regional adoption rescue center.”

Not only did the event serve to benefit the local organization, it was a chance for students, dog and cat people alike, to get their animal fix in and unwind from the stress of midterms.

“I miss my dog so much while I’m on campus, so playing with these puppies did a great job of reducing my homesickness,” said Junior Sam West. “I couldn’t decide my favorite; each one I met was so cute and easy to fall in love with.”

The dogs ran around downstairs in the Phi Psi basement, while the cats were kept upstairs. The cats were kept in their portable homes, but could be taken out to hold.

“Lazarus was my favorite (cat); he was so friendly and fun to pet,” said junior Makenna Huff. “Normally cats don’t like me, but my time with Lazarus was just as good as playing with the puppies downstairs.”

For those interested in helping out but are unable to adopt, Lally said there are other ways tstudents could assist the animals without adoption.  She encouraged those in attendance to stay in contact with the Canine Collective. Lally said she welcomes fresh perspectives that can help the organization in connecting with a younger demographic.

“It can be something as small as taking a dog out for some time in the park to things like helping us transport the dogs we rescue,” Lally said. “Any amount of time you can give makes a difference.”

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